How To Make Goat Milk Yogurt

20 Aug

Most yogurt sold in stores is made from cow’s milk which is not always easy to digest. Therefore, people with delicate stomachs may prefer to use goat milk when making their yogurt. Many make the mistake of thinking that goat milk yogurt is very complicated and requires hard to get ingredients, but in reality, it is very simple to make this nutritious food.

The first time you make goat milk yogurt, you will most likely need to buy a live culture of the bacteria used in yogurt. Once you make it, you can just add a little bit of your last batch to each new batch. The key to making good goat milk yogurt is being very precise with your temperature measurements. If it turns out runny or slimy, it most likely got too cold during the incubation period. Once it is done, you can use your tasty goat milk yogurt in smoothies, dips, and drinks, or you can just enjoy a big bowl of it drizzled with honey and fresh fruit.

Utensils Needed
The first step to making goat milk yogurt is ensuring that you have all of the proper kitchen tools needed to make yogurt easily. You do not actually need a fancy yogurt maker for goat milk yogurt. Instead, you just need these basic items:
A sterilized glass jar with a lid that holds at least 32 fluid ounces.
A saucepan
An accurate food thermometer
A spoon
Some sort of incubator to keep yogurt warm (more below)

Ingredients
1 quart of goat milk
A tablespoon of yogurt starter with live cultures or ΒΌ cup of plain yogurt with live active cultures
1 tablespoon of powdered milk (cow or goat milk is fine)

Preparation
1. Slowly warm the goat milk until it reaches somewhere between 44 and 46 degrees Celsius. Any temperature over 54 degrees Celsius will kill the active cultures in the yogurt starter, and these bacteria are essential to making a good yogurt.
2. Stir the powdered milk into the warm milk slowly. This will give the yogurt a thicker texture once it is done.
3. Put the yogurt starter or plain yogurt into the bottom of the container. Slowly pour the 46 degree milk into the glass and stir it to combine it.
4. Put the yogurt into some sort of incubator that will keep it between 44 and 46 degrees for several hours. A cooler filled with hot water or an oven kept on an extremely low setting should do the trick.
5. Incubate the yogurt for 6 to 8 hours, until thickened to desired consistency. Keep in mind that longer incubation periods cause stronger tasting yogurt.

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